The Center for Climate & Security

RELEASE: Bipartisan Military, Political & City Leaders Talk Climate Security in San Diego

LCACs storm Camp Pendleton beach

U.S. Navy Gunner’s Mate 3rd Class Dakota Griffin,  Camp Pendleton Calif., Composite Training Unit Exercise, March 27, 2015

RELEASE: Bipartisan Military, Political and City Leaders Talk Climate Change Risks and Opportunities in San Diego

Event brings US and Asia-Pacific perspective on building U.S. military and community resilience to climate change

San Diego, CA – Republican Mayor Kevin Faulconer, Democratic Congressman Scott Peters, military experts who served in both Republican and Democratic administrations, and community leaders from the San Diego area, are gathering at the Veterans Museum at Balboa Park in San Diego to discuss existing and future national security risks from climate change, and outline opportunities for Asia-Pacific cooperation on the issue at a daylong summit on Tuesday, February 21. The Center for Climate and Security, with support from The San Diego Foundation and the Skoll Global Threats Fund, are hosting the forum to inform policy responses to climate risks that will benefit both military and civilian communities, at home and in the broader Asia-Pacific region. (more…)

Event: Security & Climate: Issues and Perspectives for the Pacific Coast

US Army Blackhawk Wildfire California

California Army National Guard conducts helicopter bucket training at Irvine Lake,  to prepare for wildfire season

The Center for Climate and Security, with support from The San Diego Foundation and the Skoll Global Threats Fund, is hosting a high-level event ‘Security & Climate Change: Issues and Perspectives for the Pacific Coast’ in San Diego, California on Tuesday, February 21. Confirmed speakers include: San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer (R), Congressman Scott Peters (D-CA), Rear Admiral Yancy B. Lindsey, Commander, Navy Region Southwest, General Ron Keys, U.S. Air Force (ret), Ambassador Reno Harnish, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The full agenda is below.

The US is a Pacific nation. The Asia-Pacific is one of the most disaster prone and climate vulnerable regions of world with a rapidly-growing population. It’s the most militarized part of the globe, and home to both rising powers and failed states – including states with nuclear capabilities. And it’s also home to some of the U.S.’s closest allies. The US military hosts numerous coastal installations across the region (including on the West Coast of the U.S.), and the U.S. is slowly but surely “rebalancing” towards this critical region. Considering this reality, addressing climate change risks in the Asia-Pacific should be a key element of U.S. national security and foreign policy, not least as that response presents significant opportunities for the United States, both at home and abroad. We are at a critical moment in time when we must decide whether or not we will lead in addressing the most pressing challenges of the 21st century. This conference aims to start answering that question. (more…)

New Briefer: Coastal Megacities vs. the Sea

lagos_nigeria_6352734402BRIEFER: Coastal Megacities vs. the Sea: Climate and Security in Urban Spaces
Janani Vivekananda (adelphi) & Neil Bhatiya (The Center for Climate and Security)

Cities are on the sharp end of a range of risks from criminal violence, terrorism and war to demographic pressures, to climate and environmental change. Coastal megacities are especially at risk given the specific impacts of climate change they face, including accelerated global sea-level rise, increased storm frequency and severity, and destruction to critical infrastructure such as port facilities, rail and road linkages, and energy installations, all of which are amplified as urban populations become ever larger. All these risks can lead to the loss of livelihoods as well as significant loss of life itself. Furthermore, the interaction of these risks could exceed the existing coping capacity of communities and governments and contribute to an increase in insecurity and possibly violent conflict. Read more.

Weather Channel: 13 years of military planning for sea level rise

800px-Navy Norfolk Virginia

USS Harry S. Truman, Norfolk Naval Shipyard, VA. (U.S. Navy photo, Mass Comm Specialist 3rd Class Tyler Folnsbee)

Center for Climate and Security Advisory Board member, Brigadier General Gerald Galloway, U.S. Army (ret), recently spoke to the Weather Channel about sea level rise risks to military installations along the U.S. coast. When asked where the Department of Defense (DoD) was in its planning for sea level rise (compared to other communities along the coast), General Galloway noted that it has been doing so since the G.W. Bush Administration, and that military bases and their surrounding support communities must build resilience to sea level rise risks in tandem. From the interview: (more…)

A Short Note on Migration and Security in a Changing Climate

statue_of_liberty_arm_1876_phildadelphis_centennial_exposition_bw

Statue of Liberty Arm, 1876, Philadelphia Centennial Exposition.

Looking at the world today, we can see strong signals of what the future may bring: unprecedented climate risks and natural resource stress, continuing refugee crises, and responses from governments ranging from welcoming with open arms to watching as the most vulnerable perish. Long-simmering and emerging conflicts will not be solved overnight. Stresses on water and food, and the inability of governments to provide these basic resources for their citizens, are not going to go away. The growing and multi-faceted push and pull drivers of migration are not going away either.  These challenges we can foresee. But with foresight comes a “responsibility to prepare,” and to do so in a manner that is consistent with our values.

The difference between today and tomorrow rests in what we as nations choose to do in the face of these challenges. Do we choose humanitarian responses that truly enhance our security or do we choose to artificially isolate ourselves?

For millennia and for many today, mobility is security.  Governments will need to recognize that reality and start developing both preventive solutions and ameliorative responses that enhance human security, and, in so doing, bolster security worldwide.

G7 Workshop on Climate Change, Fragility and International Security in Tokyo

g7_secretary_kerry_sits_with_japanese_foreign_minister_kishida_and_his_counterparts_at_the_miyajima_island_26252716252

U.S. Secretary of State sits with Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida and his counterparts amid the G7 Ministerial Meetings. [State Department Photo/Public Domain]

By Stella Schaller, adelphi
This is a crosspost from Climate Diplomacy

On 19 January 2017, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan hosted a roundtable seminar with international experts and country representatives to follow up on G7 efforts to address climate-fragility risks.

Climate change is a ‘threat multiplier’ that will increase state fragility, fuel social unrest and potentially unleash violent conflict. Japan, as part of the Group of 7 (G7), has recognized the resulting challenges for sustainable economic development, peace and stability. Following up on the independent report “A New Climate for Peace: Taking Action on Climate and Fragility Risks” commissioned by G7 members, the foreign ministers of the G7, in April 2016, reiterated their commitment to take preventive steps and integrate climate-fragility considerations into their planning. (more…)

Theatrical Premiere: The Age of Consequences

FemiaMemeMark your calendars for Friday, January 27 from 7:00 PM9:00 PM EST for the premiere of the documentary film The Age of Consequences in New York. The film explores the complex linkages between climate and conflict. Produced by Jared P. Scott and Sophie Robinson, the film includes interviews with the Center for Climate and Security’s Francesco Femia, and Advisory Board members Rear Admiral (ret) David Titley, Marcus King, and Sherri Goodman, as well as other experts in the field. If you are not in New York, chances are there will be a screening near you (or you can host your own). If you can’t make it, the second-best option might be to watch a panel discussion about the film below, featuring many of the film’s cast-members, from last year’s Climate and National Security Forum (more…)

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