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Femia on TRT World: The Strategic Benefit of Acting on Climate and Security

Francesco Femia on TRT WorldIn an interview segment released yesterday by TRT World, Francesco Femia, the Co-Founder of the Center for Climate and Security and CEO of the Council on Strategic Risks, spoke with host Ghida Fakhry and WRI’s Rebecca Carter about the increasing evidence of a connection between climate change and conflict, the  growing bipartisan consensus in the United States about the security risks of climate change, and the idea of action on climate and security as a strategic benefit for countries that wish to expand their leadership and influence.  The interview begins at 17:45, below.

Unprecedented Risks, Unprecedented Foresight: A “Responsibility to Prepare” Strategy for the United States in 2020

indopacom

INDOPACOM service members aiding FEMA operations on Saipan and Tinian as they recover from typhoon Yutu, the 2nd worst storm ever to hit U.S. soil (Oct 2018)

The Council on Strategic Risks (CSR) is a security policy institute devoted to anticipating, analyzing and addressing core systemic risks to security in the 21st century, with special examination of the ways in which these risks intersect and exacerbate one another. To further this goal, CSR hosts non-partisan centers tackling unprecedented security risks from climate change (The Center for Climate and Security) and nuclear, biological and chemical weapons (The Center on Strategic Weapons), as well as a program designed to study converging, cross-sectoral threats (The Converging Risks Lab). As the United States looks forward to 2020, it must use its unprecedented foresight to prepare for and address these unprecedented security risks.

A Responsibility to Prepare Strategy for 2020

The bad news is that the United States and its allies currently face unprecedented risks from climate change; nuclear, biological and chemical weapons; authoritarian nationalism; and other disruptive trends. The good news is that the U.S. and its allies, due to advances in data-analysis technologies, including AI, also possess unprecedented foresight about these risks. That combination of unprecedented risks and unprecedented foresight underlines a Responsibility to Prepare. This responsibility will fall to whomever assumes the office of the President of the United States in 2020. (more…)

Climate Change as a Non-State Actor

Ladakh,_India_(14687115252)By Neil Bhatiya, Climate and Diplomacy Fellow, The Center for Climate and Security

Over at The Strategy Bridge, I have a new piece on the nature of climate change as a threat to international peace and security, and how the U.S. government is responding to it and should respond to it in the future. In many ways, climate change is a unique challenge to U.S. foreign policy. There is very little precedent for facing a threat this complex and wide in scope. From the article: (more…)

New Report: The U.S. Asia-Pacific Rebalance, National Security and Climate Change

USAsiaPacifcRebalanceImageIf the United States is to “rebalance” to the Asia-Pacific region  – building and broadening alliances, helping advance regional security and prosperity in the face of potentially catastrophic change, and advancing U.S. national security interests – it will have to seriously consider how climate change affects the region, how the U.S. can help advance the climate resilience of the region’s diverse nations, and how the U.S. will adapt strategically to a changed security environment. This new report, “The U.S. Asia- Pacific Rebalance, National Security and Climate Change,” published by the Center for Climate and Security, in partnership with the Carnegie Mellon University Civil and Environmental Engineering Program, the Center for New American Security and the University of Oxford, explores ways in which the effects of climate change will both shape, and be shaped by, the U.S. strategic rebalance to the Asia-Pacific. It also offers solutions for how the effects of climate change can be addressed in a strategic way, through implementing region-wide “Climate-Security Plans,” adapting military infrastructure, and supporting key nations that are grappling with climate risks to their food, water and energy security. The report’s foreword, written by former U.S. Pacific Commander, Admiral Samuel J. Locklear, III, USN (Ret), notes:

“As we seek to rebalance and reinvigorate our historic alliances, build new strategic and economic partnerships, and effectively posture our military in the Asia-Pacific for the 21st century, we must address the potentially catastrophic security implications of climate change in the Asia-Pacific and their likely impact on U.S. interests in the region.”
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