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The Climate and Security Podcast: Episode 5 with Francesco Femia and Caitlin Werrell

CCS Podcast_Femia and WerrellWelcome back to The Climate and Security Podcast! In this special Episode 5 we get two for one!

In this episode, host Dr. Sweta Chakraborty talks to the CEOs of The Council on Strategic Risks and Co-Founders of the Center for Climate and Security: Francesco Femia and Caitlin Werrell. Sweta asks Caitlin and Frank what inspired them to launch their institute, and the answer is eye opening! They discuss a future where stresses on natural resources have the potential to influence geopolitics and increase the likelihood of mass atrocities against ethnic minorities and other vulnerable groups. They also discuss a “Responsibility to Prepare,” driven by a combination of unprecedented risks and unprecedented foresight – a core principle underpinning their work.

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RELEASE: At Critical Juncture for the EU, Experts Unveil “Europe’s Responsibility to Prepare” Framework for Climate and Security

Europes Responsibility to Prepare_Cover ImageRELEASE: At a Critical Juncture for the EU, Experts Unveil “Europe’s Responsibility to Prepare (R2 Prepare)” Framework for Managing Security Risks of Climate Change

Brussels, Belgium – In advance of a critical meeting of European Union (EU) security leaders on June 22, which marks the 10th anniversary of the EU’s landmark report on climate change and security, two leading think tanks have released a report outlining a new framework for the European Union to transform its response to the security risks of climate change.

In “Europe’s Responsibility to Prepare: Managing Climate Security Risks in a Changing World”, the Center for Climate and Security (based in Washington, DC) and the Clingendael Institute (based in The Hague) argue that the security threats of climate change should be more routinely integrated into EU institutions at a senior level and be elevated alongside other ‘traditional’ security issues like terrorism and nuclear threats. As the EU’s conflict prevention mechanisms are making progress in better-addressing climate risks, the report gives detailed recommendations on what a response scaled to the threat of climate change across EU bodies could look like. (more…)

Release: A Responsibility to Prepare – Military and National Security Leaders Release New Reports on Climate Change

Trumbo Point

Naval Air Station Key West, Trumbo Point Annex, Florida. April 2016. US Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cody R. Babin

Washington, DC – On Capitol Hill today, two nonpartisan groups of senior military and national security experts facilitated by the Center for Climate and Security (CCS) released reports identifying rapidly-growing risks to national security due to climate change, and urging the U.S. government to take those risks seriously (click here for a livestream of the release event, beginning at 9:30am EST). The reports include the 2nd Edition of CCS’s Military Expert Panel Report: Sea Level Rise and the U.S. Military’s Mission and the Climate and Security Advisory Group’s Roadmap and Recommendations for the U.S. Government which outlines a “Responsibility to Prepare” framework for the U.S. government. (more…)

2017 Closes with Heightened National and International Attention to Climate and Security

PSI 2017 _ CCS team 2

The Center for Climate and Security team at the Hague (from left): Rachel Fleishman, Heather Messera, Shiloh Fetzek, Hon. Sherri Goodman, Rear Admiral Ann Phillips, USN (Ret)

The close of 2017 demonstrated that attention to the security risks of climate change has grown significantly on the international stage. The annual international climate security gathering, the Planetary Security Conference (PSC for the acronym-inclined), took place in The Hague on December 12-13, and was immediately followed by a UN Security Council dialogue on climate and security on December 15, chaired by the Italian government. Further, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Congress, the EU and the Australian Senate, all showed leadership on addressing this risk. (more…)

A Responsibility to Prepare: Governing in an Age of Unprecedented Risk and Foresight

UN_security_council_2005Report summary: The world in the 21st century is characterized by both unprecedented risk and unprecedented foresight. Climate change, population shifts and cyber-threats are rapidly increasing the scale and complexity of risks to international security, while technological developments are increasing our capacity to foresee those risks. This world of high consequence risks, which can be better modeled and anticipated than in the past, underscores a clear responsibility for the international community: A “Responsibility to Prepare.” This responsibility, which builds on hard-won lessons of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) framework for preventing and responding to mass atrocities, requires a reform of existing governance institutions to ensure that critical, nontraditional risks to international security, such as climate change, are anticipated, analyzed and addressed systematically, robustly and rapidly by intergovernmental security institutions and the security establishments of nations that participate in that system. For more, see the Responsibility to Prepare page, including the full report.