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Tag Archives: Middle East and North Africa

The Climate and Security Podcast: Episode 11 with Dr. Marcus King

Marcus King_Climate and Security Podcast Episode 11Welcome back to The Climate and Security Podcast!

In this episode, host Dr. Sweta Chakraborty talks to Dr. Marcus King, Senior Fellow and Member of the Advisory Board at the Center for Climate and Security, and Director of the Master of Arts in International Affairs Program at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs. Sweta asks Marcus to define environmental security, which he describes as the study of conflicts related to a lack or abundance of natural resources, particularly as it relates to impacts associated with climate change. Droughts and water scarcity impacts are especially salient on the world stage, and Marcus highlights his case studies in increasingly vulnerable places in the Middle East and North Africa (e.g., Syria, Nigeria, Yemen) which are experiencing and are ripe for future humanitarian crises, interstate conflicts, and mass migrations. Listen to Marcus describe the nuances between environmental migrants versus climate refugees and how these already vulnerable populations are prime recruitment targets for terrorist groups such as Boko Haram. This is an eye-opening episode! (more…)

New Article: “The Nexus of Climate Change, State Fragility and Migration”

Reuters/Rodi Said

Reuters/Rodi Said

Imperial College London’s Angle Journal recently published an article by Center for Climate and Security Co-directors Caitlin Werrell and Francesco Femia titled “The Nexus of Climate Change, State Fragility and Migration.” Here is an excerpt from the introduction:

The greatest migration since World War II is under way. Refugees are flowing in record numbers from Syria to both surrounding countries, and Europe. It is a humanitarian crisis of the highest order.

The proximate cause of this migration – the most immediate reason for it – is the long and brutal conflict in Syria. But a humanitarian crisis of such a historic and horrific scale necessitates the asking (and answering) of broader questions concerning a range of potential underlying contributors and causes. Here we examine the role of climate change with regard to state fragility and migration, and propose three guiding principals for governments to follow when faced with complex and uncertain climate-related threats.

Click here for the full piece.

Summer Reading List: New Offerings on Climate Change and Security

beach_readingChoosing what to read on the beach has been a perennially difficult choice. We are making that choice easier. A range of new volumes, reports, testimonies and concept notes on climate change and security have been released recently, and all of them are worth a read in the sun (apologies to those south of the equator currently experiencing winter). Below is a list of those that came across our desk, and have been printed out for transport to the shoreline. (more…)

Climate Change and Security in the News: Week (and a Half) in Review

Damascus_PanoramaThe past week and a half saw a lot of mainstream attention paid to the human and national security implications of climate change, and what needs to be done about it. Here’s a quick snapshot: (more…)

Friedman: Climate Change “The Scary Hidden Stressor”

Damascus_PanoramaThe Center for Climate and Security thanks Tom Friedman for devoting his Sunday OpEd, titled “The Scary Hidden Stressor,” to our report “The Arab Spring and Climate Change,” and the issues and opportunities that it raises. A huge thanks also to the other authors involved: Anne-Marie Slaughter, Troy Sternberg, Jeffrey Mazo, Sarah Johnstone, Michael Werz, Max Hoffman, David Michel and Mona Yacoubian.

Climate, Energy and Resource Security in the Middle East and North Africa

Luxor_west_bank4E3G has just released an excellent new report titled “Underpinning the MENA Democratic Transition: Delivering Climate, Energy and Resource Security,” co-authored by Nick Mabey, Sabrina Schulz, Taylor Dimsdale, Luca Bergamaschi and Amal-Lee Amin. From their website: (more…)