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Climate & Security Weekend Watch List

488px-%22Movies_tonight..Keep_covered._Fight_the_peril_behind_the_lines%22_-_NARA_-_515032Happy Friday! There were a number of climate and security-related events over the past couple of weeks, some of which were recorded. Listed below are some that caught our eye, and might make for great weekend climate and security binge listening/watching! (more…)

IPCC Report Climate Security Takeaways: It’s All About The Risk

Ganges_River_Delta,_Bangladesh,_IndiaThe Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released findings from Working Group II of its 5th Assessment Report yesterday. The report, titled “Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability,” addresses observed and projected impacts of climate change on human systems, and what people are doing to adapt. Both the summary for policy-makers and the full report are worth reading in full. At first glance, here are some key takeaways from the security perspective: (more…)

Weekend Reading: Degrees of Risk

448px-Risk_LegacyIn light of the release of the IPCC’s “Summary for Policymakers” today, we recommend reading (or re-reading) E3G’s “Degrees of Risk” report, which was released in 2011, but increases in timeliness with each passing year.

Brad Plumer’s article this morning had a great headline: The science of global warming has changed a lot in 25 years. The basic conclusions haven’t. The basic conclusions have not changed, but what does that mean for policymakers? Degrees of Risk offers an appropriate “risk management” framework for guiding policymakers towards a better understanding of the extent of the climate risks we face, as well as steps we can take to mitigate those risks.  The report notes: (more…)

The Ice Melt Equation: An Ultimate Geopolitical Calculus

Ice_and_Clouds_in_the_Bering_StraitThis is a cross-post from Relief Analysis Wire

“Do ice sheets have a linear or exponential melt rate?”

This question may not be echoed frequently around the command centers of NATO, streets of Damascus, or ministries of Beijing. But if researchers James Hansen and Makiko Sato are correct in their inkling, then geopolitics, global security, and humanitarian operations just got extremely problematic in the coming decades. (more…)

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