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Weekend Reading: Degrees of Risk

448px-Risk_LegacyIn light of the release of the IPCC’s “Summary for Policymakers” today, we recommend reading (or re-reading) E3G’s “Degrees of Risk” report, which was released in 2011, but increases in timeliness with each passing year.

Brad Plumer’s article this morning had a great headline: The science of global warming has changed a lot in 25 years. The basic conclusions haven’t. The basic conclusions have not changed, but what does that mean for policymakers? Degrees of Risk offers an appropriate “risk management” framework for guiding policymakers towards a better understanding of the extent of the climate risks we face, as well as steps we can take to mitigate those risks.  The report notes: (more…)

An EU Special Representative on Climate Security?

Following a debate last week regarding the EU’s Common Security and Defense Policy (CSDP), and its role in addressing “climate-driven natural disasters,” the European Parliament’s foreign affairs committee has called for the creation of an EU special representative on climate security, which was echoed publicly by the influential British member of the European Parliament (MEP), Graham Watson.

The debate also resulted in a resolution on climate change and security by the European Parliament. According to the Parliament’s new service:

Climate change is the biggest threat to the global security, says a resolution drafted by Indrek Tarand (Greens/EFA, EE) and passed with 474 votes in favour, 80 against and 18 abstentions. Climate change exacerbates natural disasters that are destabilising, especially for vulnerable states, so its potential impact on security should be factored into EU external policies, it warns.

We will continue to watch this space for further developments, as the European Parliament’s suggestions make their way to the other organs of EU governance (namely, the Council of the European Union) that would need to approve them in order to be realized.

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