The Center for Climate & Security

Home » Posts tagged 'democracy'

Tag Archives: democracy

Karachi’s Heat Wave a Sign of Future Challenges to Pakistan’s Fragile Democracy

A man (R) cools off under a public tap, while others wait to fill their bottles, during intense hot weather in Karachi, Pakistan, June 23, 2015. A devastating heat wave has killed more than 400 people in Pakistan's southern city of Karachi over the past three days, health officials said on Tuesday, as paramilitaries set up emergency medical camps in the streets. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro  - RTX1HPUL

A devastating heat wave has killed more than 400 people in Pakistan’s southern city of Karachi over the past three days. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro- RTX1HPUL

This is a cross-post from the New Security Beat.

July 8, 2015 | By Tim Kovach

Karachi, the world’s second largest city by population, is emerging from the grips of a deadly heatwave. A persistent low pressure system camped over the Arabian Sea stifled ocean breezes and brought temperatures in excess of 113°F (45°C) to the city of 23 million people in June. The searing heat disrupted electricity and water service, making life nearly unbearable. All told, officials estimate the heatwave killed at least 1,200 Pakistanis, more than twice as many as have died in terrorist attacks this year. (more…)

New Research: Food Riots, Governance and Climate Change

Protesters marching in Cairo, "Bread, Freedom, Social Justice By, Mariam Soliman from Cairo, Egypt

Protesters marching in Cairo, “Bread, Freedom, Social Justice By, Mariam Soliman from Cairo, Egypt

This is a cross-post from New Security Beat by Cullen Hendrix

*We draw special attention to the conclusion of the article (emphasis added):

Our research suggests that reducing urban biases, like food subsidies, may be good pro-poor policy, given the continued concentration of poverty in the countryside, but it carries political risks. Thus, developing country governments face a tradeoff in pursuing two separate but linked definitions of food security: food security as a component of human security, where pro-poor policies may be the best answer, and food security as a component of national security, where urban interests seem the most pressing.

(more…)

A Moment of Democratic Resilience: Climate and the Elections

It’s election day in the United States, so we’ll be brief. In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, we have seen great tragedy, but also hope for the resilience of American democracy in the face of climatic changes, and devastated infrastructure. One such example involves the process of voting. In New Jersey, the U.S. military will be providing mobile polling places in the form of military vehicles for those who will have difficulty getting to the polls. Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey has also announced that voters will be able to either email or fax their votes in, offering up another channel for people to exercise their right. But it is yet to be seen how many people are kept from voting because of the storm, and how well these emergency systems work in terms of keeping that number low. Watch this space for more later.

The Maldives: Climate Resilience Tied to Democratic Resilience

This past February, on the heels of the forced removal of the democratically-elected President of the Maldives (and international climate action champion) Mohamed Nasheed, we wrote about the oft-neglected political factors of climate vulnerability, stating: (more…)

The Maldives Wake Up Call: Time to Factor Politics Into Climate Vulnerability

The recent events in the Maldives, which led to the ouster of a President known for his human rights and climate activism, is a potential blow to both the island nation’s fledgling democracy (conceived a mere four years ago), and its ambitions for climate resilience. In the span of a few hours, the country’s democratic dawn turned to democratic night. (more…)