The Center for Climate & Security

Home » Posts tagged 'climate-security' (Page 2)

Tag Archives: climate-security

New Book: Climate Change and European Security

EU High Representative Ashton Speaks at the UN in Geneva, Switzerland , photo by US Dept of State

EU High Representative Ashton Speaks at the UN in Geneva, Switzerland

Routledge has just released a new book, Climate Change and European Security, by Richard Youngs, a senior associate with the democracy and rule of law program at Carnegie Europe. This book provides an important synthesis of how the European Union has set about integrating climate change concerns into its foreign and security policy. The top line summary of the book notes that despite some advances in this space, there is still ample progress to be made: (more…)

Look to Variability, Not Just Scarcity, for Water Conflict Clues

Water_reservoir,_yemenThis is a cross-post from the New Security Beat, written by Cullen Hendrix.

Opportunity Costs: Evidence Suggests Variability, Not Scarcity, Primary Driver of Water Conflict

Nearly 1 billion people lack reliable access to clean drinking water today. A report by the Water Resources Group projects that by 2030 annual global freshwater needs will reach 6.9 trillion cubic meters – 64 percent more than the existing accessible, reliable, and sustainable supply. This forecast, while alarming, likely understates the magnitude of tomorrow’s water challenge, as it does not account for the impacts of climate change. (more…)

Special Issue on Climate and Security: Evidence, Emerging Risks, and a New Agenda

800px-Flickr_-_usaid.africa_-_Improved_access_to_resources_like_water_can_prevent_potential_conflictThe Journal Climate Change has just released a new special issue titled “Climate and Security: Evidence, Emerging Risks, and a New Agenda.” This issue provides a timely assessment of the current state of peer-reviewed climate and security research. It is critically important to continue research in the space and disentangle the links between climate change, peace and conflict. This body of research suggests that there is ample evidence that climate change can act as a “threat multiplier” – exacerbating other socio-political, economic and environmental conditions, but that there is a need to continue investigating the minutiae of how exactly climate change interacts with these factors, and what it could mean for a future with a greater intensity and frequency of climatic events. (more…)

Climate Security in the State Department 2014 U.S. Climate Action Report to the UNFCCC

600px-Department_of_stateThe U.S. State Department has just released its “2014 U.S. Climate Action Report to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.” As announced on the official website:

On January 1, 2014, the Department of State submitted the 2014 U.S. Climate Action Report to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). This report, which includes the First U.S. Biennial Report and Sixth U.S. National Communication to the UNFCCC, details actions the United States is taking domestically and internationally to mitigate, adapt to, and assist others in addressing climate change. (more…)

White House Honors Veterans for Advancing Clean Energy and Climate Security

Soldiers_assist_residents_displaced_by_Hurricane_Sandy_in_Hoboken,_N.J.The White House is hosting an event today honoring twelve American veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan from across the country as “Champions of Change” for their work in advancing clean energy and increasing climate resilience and preparedness in their communities. (more…)

Climate Change and Security Conferences: Fall/Winter 2013

Conference_table2There are some interesting conferences on the horizon investigating the risks of climate change.  Many of these are either streaming the conference live or will post conference videos and materials at a later date, so even if you are not able to attend in person, you can check them out. We will update this list as we come across others. (more…)

Scientific American: The U.S. Military, Operational Energy and Climate Change

A recent piece in Scientific American on the operational benefits the U.S. military derives from reducing fossil fuel dependence, and the degree to which the Pentagon has integrated climate change into its planning. Worth a look.