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General Carleton-Smith: British Army Should Develop Non-Fossil Fuel Dependent Vehicles

Tactical Air Refueller

An Oshkosh Tactical Air Refueller Wheeled Tanker at Salisbury Plain by 4 Regiment Army Air Corps (AAC)

By Marc Kodack

In an article published today, General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith, Chief of the British General Staff, said the current generation of tactical vehicles may be the last to be powered by fossil fuels. Benefits to ending this dependence on fossil fuels would be logistical, e.g. reduce the logical tail risk, and put the British Army on “the right side of the environmental argument,” he noted. He called on British industry to develop the next generation of vehicles that are simultaneously “battle winning but also environmentally sustainable.” Doing so would also assist in influencing the career decisions of future recruits who may consider “prospective employer’s environmental credentials.”

Top 10 Most Climate-Vulnerable Military Bases According to U.S. Armed Forces

Offutt Air Force Base_battling_flood_waters_190317-F-IT794-1053

Offutt Air Force Base flooded on March 17, 2019, caused by increase in water levels of surrounding waterways due to record-setting snowfall in winter & large drop in air pressure (U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt. Rachelle Blake)

By John Conger

In 2017, the U.S. Congress directed the Department of Defense (DoD) to develop a list of the installations in each military service that were most vulnerable to climate change.  They gave DoD a year to do this work, as it wasn’t simple.  The DoD would need to look across its enterprise, and determine how it would measure vulnerability and assess which risks were specifically from climate change.  At the Center for Climate and Security, we published a briefer on the factors they might consider. (more…)

General Gordon Sullivan Joins the Center for Climate and Security Advisory Board

gensullivanportraitsmThe Center for Climate and Security is pleased and honored to announce that General Gordon R. Sullivan, US Army (Ret), has joined its distinguished Advisory Board of military and national security leaders.

General Sullivan culminated his service in uniform as the 32nd Chief of Staff of the United States Army—the senior general officer in the army—and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. As the Chief of Staff of the Army, Sullivan created the vision and led the team that transitioned the army from its Cold War posture. In August 1993, President Bill Clinton assigned the duties and responsibility of acting Secretary of the Army to Sullivan who continued to serve as Chief of Staff.
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The Climate and Security Podcast: Episode 7 with Joan VanDervort

joanvandervort_climateandsecuritypodcastWelcome back to The Climate and Security Podcast!

In this episode Joan VanDervort, Member of the Center for Climate and Security Advisory Board and former Deputy Director for Ranges, Sea and Airspace in the U.S. Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Readiness), talks about how climate change impacts military training and readiness. Joan pulls from her extensive career in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to explain how training is the cornerstone of readiness.  Climate factors, like intense rainfall impacts on infrastructure and increased heat causing trainee and soldier hospitalizations, pose serious risks to training and ultimately to the ability to successfully carry out military missions. Joan also discuss how the DoD tracks the migration of diseases as well as the health of military personal going into combat. Tune into this episode for insights into military readiness that can only come from decades of experience as a civil servant.

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Army Training and Doctrine Command Says Climate Change Will Shape Future Operating Environment

Sailor_directs_a_U.S._Army_light_medium_tactical_vehicle_off_a_landing_craft,_utility._(37285057102)

U.S. Army Service members return toU.S. Virgin Islands to assist with disaster relief operations in response to hurricanes Irma and Maria, Sept. 23, 2017

By John Conger

As the U.S. Army prepares troops for the future of warfare, it has, without question, a lot on its plate.  Complicating that picture for the Army is climate change. The Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), which as its name implies is responsible for overseeing training and operational doctrine development for the Army, affirmed at a recent conference that it sees climate change as a key factor influencing how and where the Army will fight.

As reported by the Army Times: (more…)

Army Assistant Secretary Nominee on Whether or Not Climate Change Affects the Military: “Absolutely.”

Alex Beehler

Alex Beehler, nominee for Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy, and Environment, before the Senate Armed Services Committee, August 22, 2018

On August 21, Alex Beehler, the nominee for Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy, and Environment, was asked by Rhode Island Senator Jack Reed during a confirmation hearing about whether or not he agreed with Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis’ s view that climate change affects the military mission. His response was unambiguous:

“Absolutely. Echoing what General McMahon just said, and if confirmed, from my position I will do everything to encourage installations and help direct installations to properly prepare on a case by case basis for both adverse weather and effects long-term from climate.” (more…)

Lieutenant General Stephen Lanza Joins the Center for Climate and Security Advisory Board

LtGen Lanza_USA_RetThe Center for Climate and Security is pleased and honored to announce that Lieutenant General Stephen Lanza, United States Army (Retired), has joined its distinguished Advisory Board of military, national security and foreign policy leaders.

LtGen Lanza recently retired from the Army, where his last assignment was as U.S. Army Commanding General and Senior Mission Commander for Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) in Tacoma, Washington. As the Senior Army Commander of JBLM, he led the nation’s most important joint power projection platform in the West Coast, providing superior leadership to 14 major subordinate commands and seven directorates and orchestrating their efforts to train, equip, and care for over 155,000 service members and civilians across the U.S. Armed Forces.  (more…)