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U.S. Department of Defense Releases Operational Energy Strategy Implementation Plan

DoD released its new Operational Energy Strategy Implementation Plan on Friday, which follows from last year’s release of the strategy itself. The plan fleshes out the strategy’s three-pillar approach, reiterating the key energy pathways for a “stronger force:” (more…)

General Wesley Clark On the Next Military Mission: Solar Energy

Forbes magazine ran a thoughtful piece today from Wesley Clark, retired Army General and former Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) of NATO. Clark details the military case for fully embracing solar energy, touching on the strategic benefits for the United States of moving away from centralized fossil fuel infrastructures, the cost benefits already realized, and the scale of emissions reductions that would result. In making the case for why the Department of Defense is, and should continue to be, a leader in this space, he states: (more…)

New Report: The United States, the South China Sea, Natural Resources and Climate Change

After a long transition, and winter break (a strange one, to be sure – the daffodils here in DC started to emerge yesterday, and today it’s snowing…), we’re back.

And what better post-break gift than a new report from the Center for a New American Security? “Cooperation from Strength: The United States, China and the South China Sea” is a good one. You should read the whole thing. But given our focus on climate and security, we’re going to briefly highlight the section on climate change in Will Rogers’ chapter “The Role of Natural Resources in the South China Sea.” (more…)

E3G: “economies will eventually recover, the climate is for ever.”

E3G’s Tom Burke looks at the IEA’s annual World Energy Outlook, highlighting the contrast between the technological and economic possibility of carbon neutrality in the short-term, and the seeming political impossibility of getting there, despite the severe risks associated with delay. Our favorite line: “economies will eventually recover, the climate is for ever.” It’s worth a read.

This is a cross post of Tom Burke’s piece at E3G that originally appeared here.

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