The Center for Climate & Security

Home » defense

Category Archives: defense

CNA’s Vice Admiral Lee Gunn Goes to Texas to Talk Climate and Security

800px-NASJRB_Fort_Worth_overhead_shotVice Admiral Lee Gunn, USN (Ret.) went to Texas on behalf of the Center for Naval Analyses’ Military Advisory Board to talk about climate change as a threat to national security.  While in the Lone Star State, Admiral Gunn spoke with policymakers and energy leaders.  He also made time to meet with Mose Buchele of StateImpact Texas for an interview to discuss the impacts of climate change on international security and military installations in Texas. Here is a part of the interview that looks at the overlapping stresses between governance, unrest, and climatic and ecological variables: (more…)

The U.S. Geographic Combatant Commanders on Climate Change

Will Rogers over at the Center for a New American Security has posted an excellent blog compiling posture statements and exchanges from each of the Geographic Combatant Commanders (GCCs) on climate change during recent Senate Armed Services Committee hearings. We’re re-posting it below:

(more…)

Climate Change Impacts on U.S. Military Bases in the Southwest

The U.S. Department of Defense is preparing itself for climate change risks to its military installations in the United States, and making the necessary investments. According to the Arizona Daily Star, the University of Arizona’s Institute of the Environment “will get close to $2 million in research grants over the next few years to help figure out how drought, dust storms, forest fires, lightning and rising temperatures could affect defense bases across the American Southwest.”

U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta on Climate Change and National Security

At a speech in Kentucky last Thursday, Secretary of Defense Panetta was asked a question on the implications of climate change for national security, and the future of the Defense Department. Secretary Panetta gave a thoughtful response, highlighting the security impacts of climate-aggravated drought, sea level rise and Arctic melt. (more…)