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Global Peace Index Factors in Climate Change Risks for the First Time

GPI 2019Every year since 2007, the Institute for Economics and Peace has published the “Global Peace Index (GPI),” which, as the title implies, measures the “peacefulness” of nations and regions of the world. In 2019, the GPI for the first time factored climate change into its analysis, and the results were significant. The GPI determined that climate change already has a notably negative impact on peace and security, illustrated by the following top 7 findings:

  • An estimated 971 million people live in areas with high or very high exposure to climate hazards. Of this number, 400 million or 41 per cent, reside in countries with already low levels of peacefulness.
  • Climate change can indirectly increase the likelihood of violent conflict through its impacts on resource availability, livelihood security and migration.
  • In 2017, 61.5 per cent of total displacements were due to climate-related disasters, while 38.5 per cent were caused by armed conflict.

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New Topic Guide: Conflict, Climate and Environment

Bushfire_AustraliaEvidence on Demand has created a new topic guide, “Conflict, Climate and Environment,” by Katie Peters and Janani Vivekananda. Below is an overview of the guide and a list of the key messages. The guide provides an extensive overview of climate and conflict linkages, including knowledge gaps and suggestions for effective and sensitive policy-making. A PDF of the guide can be found on the Evidence on Demand website and is well worth a read.  (more…)

Arctic Peoples and Security Conference: Jan 29-30

InuitA conference this week we thought our readers might be interested in. It is being hosted by the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, in partnership with the Canada Centre for Global Security Studies at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto, The Inuit Knowledge Centre, St. Jerome’s University and the Centre for Contemporary International History. The conference will focus on engaging “decision-makers and the academic community in a conversation about how to better integrate the needs and wants of northern residents into the broader Arctic security debate.”

It is sold out, but there will be a live webcast on both days.

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