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The Law of the Sea Treaty: Strong Support for U.S. Ratification

The U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee held a critical hearing yesterday on the benefits of U.S. accession to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). Secretary or State Hillary Clinton, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey all delivered testimonies strongly supporting ratification of the treaty by the U.S. Senate. You can find a video of their testimonies, as well as prepared comments,  here. You can also find a good UNCLOS 101 by Will Rogers, as well as a full report on the treaty, at the CNAS website. (more…)

New Report – Climate Change & International Security: The Arctic as a Bellwether

Last week, C2ES released a report titled Climate Change & International Security: The Arctic as a Bellwether.  The report highlights the role that climate change in the Arctic plays in shaping the geopolitics of the post-Cold War world.  The authors note that climatic shifts and subsequent shifts in the geopolitics of the Arctic demonstrate the importance of the linkages between climate change, energy security and economic stability. (more…)

Climate and Security 101: Why the U.S. National Security Establishment Takes Climate Change Seriously

In a 2007 report by the CNA Military Advisory Board, General Gordon R. Sullivan stated: “People are saying they want to be perfectly convinced about climate science projections…But speaking as a soldier, we never have 100 percent certainty. If you wait until you have 100 percent certainty, something bad is going to happen on the battlefield.”

The national security establishment in the United States, including the U.S. military and the U.S. intelligence community, understand that climate change is a national security threat, and that we cannot wait for 100% certainty before acting to mitigate and adapt to its effects. But not only do they understand it, they plan for it – considering it’s implications in strategic documents like the Quadrennial Defense Review, and setting up an office within the CIA called the Center for Climate Change and National Security. But why? (more…)

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