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Climate and Security Week in Review: June 11-18

Enterprise, Alabama native assists in Caribbean disaster response and security training

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Anna V. Blank at Exercise Tradewinds which provides 20+ participating nations the opportunity to improve security and disaster response capabilities in the Caribbean. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Shane Hamann.)

Here are a list of notable headlines and comments on climate and security matters from the past week. If we’ve missed any, let us know.

  • BREAKING – Barbados PM Mia Mottley announces she will be attending the OECS Summit in St Lucia next week; reiterates that re-engaging in deeper relations with the OECS is beneficial; the Summit will tackle issues such as climate change, security & regional cooperation via @KevzPolitics

  • Based on aerial mapping, we estimate that up to 200,000 refugees in Bangladesh could be at risk of landslides and floods and still need to be moved to safer areas via @Refugees
  • New Cardiff Uni research on climate-induced shifts in distribution of fish over next century & management, legal & security implications published today in Science by a unique international team of scientists and legal and intl relations experts http://science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6394/1189 via @Richard_Caddell
  • Antarctica alone is now on track to raise world sea levels by about 15 cm by 2100, above most past estimates. Sea level rise is a threat to cities from New York to Shanghai as well as low-lying nations from the Pacific Ocean to the Netherlands. http://news.trust.org/item/20180613170009-g7hfg/ via @alertnetclimate
  • We want to allocate €11 billion of our long term to humanitarian aid. This EU assistance will be on a needs-basis in order to save lives and support populations affected by natural disasters and man-made crises → @EU_Commission
  • President at : Climate change is not only an environmental matter. It also has direct implications for questions of peace and security via @TPKanslia
  • Climate change is not only an environmental issue but an issue of peace and security. In case of inaction, it will turn into a question of hard security. -All leaders should internalise these words of President Niinistö delivered at the Finnish via @SavuHelsinki
  • Can’t leave no single stone unleaved. President of the Republic of Finland Sauli Niinistö emphasized the role of individuals – each of us have to take actions by ourselves. Climate actions – not only question of the but also peace and security. via @PaiviLaitila
  • The complex interactions between climate, conflict, development, security, policy & economic growth are no more apparent than in . See how & the gov. are adopting adaptation strategies, among others, to address these issues via @UNDPClimate
  • is not only real, it’s matter of national security: “One could argue that one of the causes of the Syrian conflict was that climate change drove people off of their land.” [Jeffrey D. Feltman, Former Under-Secratary-General for Political Affairs] via @rossdakin
  • Families are living in basic shelters, often on steep hillsides, prone to landslides. Our teams are working hard to make sure the most vulnerable will still have access to assistance during rains. via @Federation
  • On 22 June, will host a high-level event ‘Climate, Peace & Security: The Time for Action’ in Brussels. The gathering will focus on: – responsibility to prepare in face of risks – moving from early warning to early action 

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