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Monthly Archives: January 2017

A Short Note on Migration and Security in a Changing Climate

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Statue of Liberty Arm, 1876, Philadelphia Centennial Exposition.

Looking at the world today, we can see strong signals of what the future may bring: unprecedented climate risks and natural resource stress, continuing refugee crises, and responses from governments ranging from welcoming with open arms to watching as the most vulnerable perish. Long-simmering and emerging conflicts will not be solved overnight. Stresses on water and food, and the inability of governments to provide these basic resources for their citizens, are not going to go away. The growing and multi-faceted push and pull drivers of migration are not going away either.  These challenges we can foresee. But with foresight comes a “responsibility to prepare,” and to do so in a manner that is consistent with our values.

The difference between today and tomorrow rests in what we as nations choose to do in the face of these challenges. Do we choose humanitarian responses that truly enhance our security or do we choose to artificially isolate ourselves?

For millennia and for many today, mobility is security.  Governments will need to recognize that reality and start developing both preventive solutions and ameliorative responses that enhance human security, and, in so doing, bolster security worldwide.

G7 Workshop on Climate Change, Fragility and International Security in Tokyo

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U.S. Secretary of State sits with Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida and his counterparts amid the G7 Ministerial Meetings. [State Department Photo/Public Domain]

By Stella Schaller, adelphi
This is a crosspost from Climate Diplomacy

On 19 January 2017, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan hosted a roundtable seminar with international experts and country representatives to follow up on G7 efforts to address climate-fragility risks.

Climate change is a ‘threat multiplier’ that will increase state fragility, fuel social unrest and potentially unleash violent conflict. Japan, as part of the Group of 7 (G7), has recognized the resulting challenges for sustainable economic development, peace and stability. Following up on the independent report “A New Climate for Peace: Taking Action on Climate and Fragility Risks” commissioned by G7 members, the foreign ministers of the G7, in April 2016, reiterated their commitment to take preventive steps and integrate climate-fragility considerations into their planning. (more…)

Theatrical Premiere: The Age of Consequences

FemiaMemeMark your calendars for Friday, January 27 from 7:00 PM9:00 PM EST for the premiere of the documentary film The Age of Consequences in New York. The film explores the complex linkages between climate and conflict. Produced by Jared P. Scott and Sophie Robinson, the film includes interviews with the Center for Climate and Security’s Francesco Femia, and Advisory Board members Rear Admiral (ret) David Titley, Marcus King, and Sherri Goodman, as well as other experts in the field. If you are not in New York, chances are there will be a screening near you (or you can host your own). If you can’t make it, the second-best option might be to watch a panel discussion about the film below, featuring many of the film’s cast-members, from last year’s Climate and National Security Forum (more…)

New Report: The Climate and Nuclear Security Intersection

Ganges_River_near_Narora_Nuclear_Power_Plant_UP_IndiaBy Andrea Rezzonico, Research Consultant

A recent Belfer Center report by Daniel Poneman, Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, former Deputy Secretary of Energy, and President and Chief Executive Officer of Centrus Energy Corp., tackles the relationship between nuclear and climate issues. The report asks an important question on the expansion of nuclear energy: “can we expand its environmental benefits without increasing the risks of nuclear terror?” (more…)